Can You Drink from the Cup from which Jesus Drank?

 
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, based on Mark 10:35-45

  James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to Jesus and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

  When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”


Scripture passage from the New Revised Standard Version Bible: Catholic Edition, copyright 1989, 1993, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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Brendan Curran, OP

About Brendan Curran, OP

Fr. Brendan serves on the International Dominican Commission for Justice and Peace. He serves as the North American Dominican Co-promoter for Justice and Peace and the Integrity of Creation, the commission for justice and peace representing Dominican sisters, brothers, priests, and laity in the United States and Canada. Fr. Brendan serves at the Resurrection Project in Chicago, advocating for school choice. Fr. Brendan Curran, O.P. is a Dominican priest who for the past several years has served as Special Assistant to the President at Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois. Fr. Curran is the founding chair of the Dominican University Latinx Visioning Working Group, designing support and leveraging the cultural strength of first-generation immigrant students and families in admissions, scholarships and grants, classroom, advising, career mentoring, and alumni/ae. Before arriving at Dominican University, Fr. Brendan served for nine years, as pastor of St. Pius V Catholic Church, considered one of the most prominent pastors fighting for immigrant rights in the Midwest. He led a parish staff of over 5o full-time employees with a budget of $ 3 million. St Pius V has been the home to the HOPE Domestic Violence Intervention Program, the largest parish-based program in the United States. In 2014, one of his proudest moments, he was a critical voice in convincing the Illinois General Assembly to pass Illinois Drivers Licenses for undocumented immigrants protecting over 300,000 immigrant drivers in Illinois. He is a founding leader of Priests for Justice for Immigrants, an organization of over 100 priests in the Archdiocese of Chicago to support for comprehensive immigration reform in the struggle for immigrant rights. He has been published in the books: Marcha! Latino Chicago and the Immigrant Rights Movement (2010, University of Illinois Press) and Hope Dies Last by Studs Terkel (2003, The New Press). He is also an outspoken presenter and facilitator on leadership and immigrant rights, Catholic Social Teaching, and retreats in the Midwest.

2 thoughts on “Can You Drink from the Cup from which Jesus Drank?

  1. Thank you for your reflection, Father. You seemed to be speaking to yourself also and that’s so encouraging to hear. Yes, there are some places where people are still inclined to treat Religious as special (not everywhere) and I think this demands even greater faithfulness and generosity from them. Continue to do the bills and laundry and so on. They will keep you rooted in reality.

  2. Thank you for your powerful, challenging message. As a vowed religious sister and a white person born in the United Ststes, I am obligated to face my unearned privilege “without ceasing”. Failure to do that means I am simply continuing exercise of that privilege.
    What probably pains me most about being treated as “holier than” or “more than” by lay people is the implicit denial of their own inherent goodness and holiness. If only they would see that they are “walking around, shining like the sun!”
    Thanks again!

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